ECOL 592 Interdisciplinary Seminar

Future Offerings

Sustaining River Hydroecosystems: the interface of physical, biological, and social sciences

Kurt Fausch, Mike Gooseff

Description:In this 2-cr seminar, students will select, summarize, and discuss readings aimed at developing a multidisciplinary understanding of river hydroecosystem structure and function as it applies to managing rivers to sustain freshwater and riparian habitat and biota in the face of human demands and climate change. Students will be evaluated on 1) selecting papers and facilitating one or more discussions of them, 2) active participation in discussions led by others, and 3) an annotated bibliography of literature on sustaining river hydroecosystems at the interface of several relevant disciplines. Instructors will evaluate students in discussions and the bibliography

Credits: 2
Restrictions: Graduate students only
First Meeting: 8/27/2014
Meeting Times: Wednesday 2-3:40
Classroom: Wagar 107
CRN: 60164
Section Number: 1
Cross Listed: Not cross listed
Enrollment Limit: 30
Background: Undergraduate degree in a physical, biological, or social science relevant to sustaining river hydroecosystems
Course Text: None. Readings will be selected jointly by instructors and students.
Instructor Contact Info:
      Kurt Fausch kurtf@cnr.colostate.edu 491-6457
      Mike Gooseff mgooseff@rams.colostate.edu 491-6057

 

Current Offerings: Spring 2014

Ecological Skepticism and Predictions (ESP)

Dan Binkley, Tom Stohlgren

Description:Progress in Ecology as a Predictive Science depends on the creative development of new ideas, combined with skeptical challenges to see which new ideas have power and warrant confidence. Ecology has a very rich record of historical predictions which did or did not (mostly not) come true. This seminar explores balancing skepticism and the making of prediction in ecology. We will evaluate the track record for historical predictions, and gain insights about why some were supported and some were wrong. Students will become more capable of evaluating predictions made by ecologists and others, and will have insights about developing valuable predictions of their own.

Credits: 1
Restrictions:
First Meeting: 1/22/2014
Meeting Times: Wednesday January 22, 10:00-10:50
Classroom: TBA
CRN: 10362
Section Number: 1
Cross Listed:
Enrollment Limit: 15
Background:
Course Text: The Rational Optimist by Matt Ridley
Instructor Contact Info:
      Dan Binkley dan@cnr.colostate.edu 16519
      Tom Stohlgren toms@nrel.colostate.edu 11980

Teaching Ecology to Undergraduate Students

Meena Balgopal, Sam Dunn, Aramati Casper

Description:Issues of student learning, instructional strategies, curriculum development, and the construction of assessment tools in a college-level natural or physical science course will be discussed. Students will create a teaching portfolio by the end of the course similar to that required by the TILT post-secondary certificate program. The objectives of this course are for students to be able to: - Design curricula using the "universal design for learning" and "understanding by design" frameworks. -Synthesize how different instructional practices in a science course (lectures, laboratories, recitations) can promote critical thinking and inquiry skills. -Construct and evaluate meaningful assessment tools that reflect learning objectives for a college science course. -Write a college science teaching philosophy

Credits: 1
Restrictions: Graduate Students Only
First Meeting: 1/21/2014
Meeting Times: Thursday, noon - 1:00 pm
Classroom: 302B - NESB
CRN: 10363
Section Number: 2
Cross Listed: None
Enrollment Limit: 12
Background: GTA experience suggested but not required
Course Text: TBA
Instructor Contact Info:
      Meena Balgopal Meena.Balgopal@colostate.edu (970) 491-4277
      Sam Dunn sam.dunn@colostate.edu (970) 491-2287
      Aramati Casper amcasper@lamar.colostate.edu

cancelled - Methods for Sampling Aquatic and Riparian Habitats

David Cooper, Erick Carlson

Description:UNFORTUNATELY, THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED. 1/16/14

Credits: 1
Restrictions:
First Meeting: 1/22/2014
Meeting Times: TBD between 12:00 PM and 3:00 PM
Classroom: TBD
CRN: 10364
Section Number: 3
Cross Listed:
Enrollment Limit: 15
Background: Riparian Ecology, Aquatic Ecology, GIS
Course Text: Papers as assigned
Instructor Contact Info:
      David Cooper David.Cooper@colostate.edu 970-491-5430
      Erick Carlson erick.carlson@colostate.edu 216-299-0946

women, population and the environment

Gillian Bowser, Karina Cespedes, Cardid Sousa

Description:What is the impact of climate change and sustainable development on different populations? Women, Population, and Environment (WPE) builds on a series through the School of Global Environmental Sustainability seminar series. Invited speakers from disciplines ranging from ecology to political science will be part of a colloquium series co-hosted with The Women's Study Center and Ethnic Studies Department. Students will explore the interdisciplinary mix of ecology and communities and have the opportunity to interact with graduate students from social science, ethnic studies and the Women's Center. This seminar course will introduce students to research methods from different disciplines and provide them with the opportunity to learn interdisciplinary research approaches.

Credits: 1
Restrictions:
First Meeting: 1/28/2014
Meeting Times: Tuesday 4 - 6
Classroom:
CRN: 10365
Section Number: 4
Cross Listed: Fills Independent research requirement for Womens Studies certificate
Enrollment Limit: 15
Background: Ecology, community and social sciences.
Course Text: assigned readings
Instructor Contact Info:
      Gillian Bowser gbowser@colostate.edu 1-5871
      Karina Cespedes karina.cespedes@colostate.edu
      Cardid Sousa Caridad.Souza@colostate.edu 1-2882

Terrestrial Ecosystem Sensitivity to Climate Change

Melinda Smith, Alan Knapp

Description:The global scale of climate change means that all terrestrial ecosystems are, and will continue to be, impacted by alterations in temperature, precipitation and more frequent and severe periods of climatic extremes. Forecasting how any particular ecosystem will respond to predicted changes in climate requires knowing the magnitude of the change in the climate driver (e.g., change in precipitation or temperature), and the sensitivity of ecosystem processes to a given change in a climate parameter. However, we know much more about how climate drivers will change than we do about why ecosystems differ in their sensitivity to these forecast changes. With this seminar, students will explore the current state of knowledge of terrestrial ecosystem sensitivity to climate changes.

Credits: 1
Restrictions:
First Meeting: 1/28/2014
Meeting Times: Tues 1-1:50 pm
Classroom: TBD
CRN: 10366
Section Number: 5
Cross Listed:
Enrollment Limit: 20
Background:
Course Text:
Instructor Contact Info:
      Melinda Smith melinda.smith@colostate.edu 9704917155
      Alan Knapp aknapp@colostate.edu 9704917010

Introduction to R

Ruth Hufbauer, Michael Koontz

Description:R is an incredibly powerful tool for statistical analysis, data management, and visualization that has been increasingly used for ecological applications. It is open source, free, and available for all operating systems. Despite this availability, it is also considered a difficult language to learn�¢?? especially for those coming from a limited background in command line programming. This course aims to introduce users to R in an interactive, hands-on format. We will focus on topics that will be common to the needs of all ecologists such as structuring, summarizing, manipulating, and plotting data. Later portions of the course will devote time to more individual-specific needs of real data sets. Class sessions will be exercise-driven and the course will include guest lectures from graduate students who have had success using R in their research. Note: this is NOT a statistics course, though some help could be given to figure out the proper syntax for more complicated statistical analyses (e.g. generalized linear mixed models, multivariate analyses). It would be the student�¢??s responsibility to verify any results with a statistician! Expected learning outcomes: a basic command of the R language, a better sense of how to collect and enter data for future analysis, a head start on something directly applicable to your research, and tools for learning more about what R can offer your research.

Credits: 1
Restrictions:
First Meeting: 1/21/2014
Meeting Times: Tuesdays at 9:00 am
Classroom: E008 Plant Science
CRN: 10367
Section Number: 6
Cross Listed:
Enrollment Limit: 15
Background:
Course Text:
Instructor Contact Info:
      Ruth Hufbauer hufbauer@lamar.colostate.edu (970) 491-6945
      Michael Koontz mikoontz@gmail.com

Interdisciplinary Water Research Seminar

LeRoy Poff, Jorge Ramirez

Description:As global climate change and population growth increase demand for water resources, researchers and managers strive to maintain conditions that satisfy societal and ecological freshwater needs. Integrating physical, biologic, and social sciences is necessary to further understand feedbacks and linkages between physical response, biological requirements, and societal demand for freshwater. In this seminar, we focus on methods of interdisciplinary research and collaboration with regard to all aspects of the hydrologic cycle including the atmosphere, ecosystems and human dimensions of freshwater resources. The direction of this course will be largely determined by student interest with potential to explore connections between the atmosphere, projected changes in climate and water availability, freshwater management strategies, freshwater ecosystems, ecosystem services, public perception of freshwater resources, public outreach and education regarding water resources, and methods of integrating these topics across disciplines. In particular, we emphasize and encourage integration of research questions across disciplines to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration. Current faculty of the Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems Education and Research program (I-WATER), including LeRoy Poff (Biology), Jorge Ramirez (Civil and Environmental Engineering), Neil Grigg (Civil and Environmental Engineering), and Scott Denning (Atmospheric Sciences), will provide guidance and share experiences pertaining to case studies of interdisciplinary water resources research. Course content will be centered around student and faculty led discussions on current research projects, and reading and discussion of applicable literature. Students will be tasked with exploring an interdisciplinary collaboration with fellow students that involves their current research project and/or interests. Student groups will present a conceptual level research proposal and/or research findings in the latter part of the semester.

Credits: 1
Restrictions: graduate students only
First Meeting: 1/21/2014
Meeting Times: 10:00 - 10:50 Tuesday
Classroom: Yates 206
CRN: 17053
Section Number: 7
Cross Listed:
Enrollment Limit: 20
Background: This course is intended to focus on graduate student research questions emerging out of the I-WATER IGERT program
Course Text: none
Instructor Contact Info:
      LeRoy Poff poff@lamar.colostate.edu 491-2079
      Jorge Ramirez ramirez@engr.colostate.edu 491-7621

 

Previous Offerings

Previous ECOL 592 course descriptions available on the Past 592 page.